Do you like reading the newspaper or catching up on current events online? The news is a very common topic of discussion, especially between friends, family members, and work colleagues. Being able to give your own opinions and talk about what's going on in the world is a good skill to have.

The phrases we've collected for you in the tables below will help you gain this skill. Take a look at them and improve your English!

Asking about the News

Want to find out somebody's opinion about a news article or tell them about an interesting story you read? Then try using some of the phrases below to ask others different questions about the news.
Did you watch the news last night?
 
Did you see the news?
 
Did you catch that report?
 
Did you hear about that bank robbery?
 
Have you seen this article about climate change?
 
Where did you see that?
 
What do you think about the elections?
 
Do you read the newspaper?
 
Did you fact-check it?
 
 
Did you see the news?
Use the sentence pattern Did you see + THING? to ask someone if they saw the news. You can use this pattern to form general questions about the news or to ask somebody if they saw a specific news story. There are many ways someone could respond. Here is an example I only saw the last couple minutes of the broadcast.
Did you catch that report?
The sentence pattern Did you catch + THING? is a colloquial way to ask someone if they saw the news. In this context, to catch simply means to see. One way someone could respond to our example sentence is That was a crazy story!.
Did you hear about that bank robbery?
By using the sentence pattern Did you hear about + THING?, you can ask if somebody knows about something, like a current event or a news report. Depending on the thing you are asking about, somebody could respond in a number of ways. For example, like this That was just up the street, right?.
What do you think about the elections?
If you want to find out somebody's opinion on something in the news, then use the sentence pattern What do you think about + THING?. Depending on what you ask about, someone might respond in a number of ways. Here is one possible way somebody could respond to our example sentence I think it'll be close next year.
Did you fact-check it?
To fact-check is a verb often used when talking about the news. It means to check other sources to make sure that something is true. It's important to do this in order to avoid bias.

Talking about the News

In the table below we've collected several phrases that you can use when talking about the news.
I like to read the newspaper in the morning.
 
I heard about it in the paper.
 
I read an in-depth report on how the forest fires started yesterday.
 
What happened yesterday?
 
I think this report is biased.
 
How do they know that for sure?
 
You shouldn't believe everything you read.
 
That sounds like a conspiracy theory to me.
 
I have no idea what you're talking about.
 
They just announced on the news that the bank robber was caught.
 
 
I think this report is biased
To give your opinion about a story or piece of news, use the sentence pattern I think + OPINION. This is easiest and most common way to share your opinion about something. The way somebody responds to your opinion will depend on the person and their own views. One way someone could respond is I agree.
That sounds like a conspiracy theory to me
A conspiracy theory is something that tries to explain how an event was caused as part of a secret plan. They are often wrong or simply guesses. Because the news can sometimes report on conspiracy theories, it's very important to continuously fact-check things.

Answers to the Most Common Questions

What are the most essential English phrases that I need to know when talking about the news?
  • Did you hear about that bank robbery?
  • What do you think about the elections?
  • I heard about it in the paper.
  • I think this report is biased.
  • Did you watch the news last night?
  • Where did you see that?
  • What happened yesterday?
  • How do they know that for sure?
What are some different ways to ask if somebody knows the news?
There are several ways to form questions in order to find out if someone knows the news:

Did you see + THING?
  • Did you see the news?
  • Did you see the story about the bar fight?
  • Did you see the report about bees?


Did you catch + THING?
  • Did you catch that report?
  • Did you catch the news?
  • Did you catch the story about the kidnapping?


Did you hear about + THING?
  • Did you hear about that bank robbery?
  • Did you hear about the car chase?
  • Did you hear about the new environmental policy?